This weekend!

Pick up your copy of the latest issue of the Dead in Hollywood fanzine: 50,000,000 Tab Fans Can’t Be Wrong at the O.C. Zine Fest this Saturday, August 24, 2019 at the Anaheim Central Library (500 West Broadway Anaheim, CA 92805) From 11AM-4PM We’ll be in the basement, so let’s raise the dead!

Pick up your copy of the latest issue of the Dead in Hollywood fanzine: 50,000,000 Tab Fans Can’t Be Wrong at the O.C. Zine Fest this Saturday, August 24, 2019 at the Anaheim Central Library (500 West Broadway Anaheim, CA 92805) From 11AM-4PM We’ll be in the basement, so let’s raise the dead!

OUTFEST OPENING NIGHT

On our way to opening night of OUTFEST to watch the documentary “Circus of Books.” Circus of Books was the first place that was willing to sell my zines. I remember the owner, Karen Mason, saying, “Why are you doing this? There’s no money in zines.” 😁 I found her candor refreshing and inspiring. Circus of Books gave me the courage and confidence to create. 2 years and 15 issues later, here we are.

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Natalie Saved My Life Tonight

𝙸𝚗 𝟷𝟿𝟻𝟻, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙼𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚋𝚞-𝚜𝚝𝚢𝚕𝚎𝚍 𝚋𝚘𝚢-𝚗𝚎𝚡𝚝-𝚍𝚘𝚘𝚛, 𝚃𝚊𝚋 𝙷𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛, 𝚋𝚎𝚕𝚒𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚌𝚊𝚛𝚎𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚜 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛. 𝚃𝚑𝚎 𝚐𝚘𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚙 𝚛𝚊𝚐 𝙲𝚘𝚗𝚏𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚗𝚝𝚒𝚊𝚕 𝚘𝚞𝚝𝚜 𝚑𝚒𝚖 𝚒𝚗 𝚊𝚗 𝚒𝚗𝚗𝚞𝚎𝚗𝚍𝚘-𝚕𝚊𝚌𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚒𝚌𝚕𝚎 𝚊𝚋𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝙷𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚋𝚎𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚊𝚛𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚊𝚝 𝚊 "𝚕𝚒𝚖𝚙-𝚠𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚙𝚊𝚓𝚊𝚖𝚊 𝚙𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚢" 𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛𝚜 𝚋𝚎𝚏𝚘𝚛𝚎 𝚑𝚎 𝚠𝚊𝚜 𝚏𝚊𝚖𝚘𝚞𝚜. 𝙵𝚘𝚛𝚝𝚞𝚗𝚊𝚝𝚎𝚕𝚢 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚒𝚜𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚛 𝚘𝚏 "𝙱𝚊𝚝𝚝𝚕𝚎 𝙲𝚛𝚢," 𝙿𝚑𝚘𝚝𝚘𝚙𝚕𝚊𝚢 - 𝚊 𝚏𝚊𝚗𝚣𝚒𝚗𝚎 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚊 𝚖𝚞𝚌𝚑 𝚋𝚒𝚐𝚐𝚎𝚛 𝚌𝚒𝚛𝚌𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚒𝚘𝚗 - 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝚊𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚊𝚖𝚎 𝚝𝚒𝚖𝚎 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚊𝚗 𝚒𝚜𝚜𝚞𝚎 𝚏𝚎𝚊𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝙷𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚊𝚗𝚍 "𝚁𝚎𝚋𝚎𝚕 𝚆𝚒𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚞𝚝 𝚊 𝙲𝚊𝚞𝚜𝚎" 𝚊𝚌𝚝𝚛𝚎𝚜𝚜 𝙽𝚊𝚝𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚎 𝚆𝚘𝚘𝚍 𝚘𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛 𝚊𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎 "𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛'𝚜 𝚖𝚘𝚜𝚝 𝚙𝚘𝚙𝚞𝚕𝚊𝚛 𝚗𝚎𝚠 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚛𝚜." 𝙷𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚌𝚛𝚎𝚍𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚆𝚘𝚘𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚙𝚊𝚛𝚝 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚜𝚊𝚟𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚑𝚒𝚜 𝚌𝚊𝚛𝚎𝚎𝚛. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚢 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚢 𝚏𝚛𝚒𝚎𝚗𝚍𝚜 𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚒𝚕 𝚆𝚘𝚘𝚍'𝚜 𝚍𝚎𝚊𝚝𝚑 𝚠𝚑𝚎𝚗 𝚜𝚑𝚎 𝚍𝚛𝚘𝚠𝚗𝚜 𝚘𝚏𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚘𝚊𝚜𝚝 𝚘𝚏 𝙲𝚊𝚝𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚗𝚊 𝙸𝚜𝚕𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚞𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛 𝚖𝚢𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚛𝚒𝚘𝚞𝚜 𝚌𝚒𝚛𝚌𝚞𝚖𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚌𝚎𝚜.

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Tab Hunter Has a Secret

"𝙸𝚝 𝚝𝚘𝚘𝚔 𝚖𝚎 𝚖𝚞𝚌𝚑 𝚝𝚘𝚘 𝚕𝚘𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚘 𝚞𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚛𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚑𝚘𝚠 𝚒𝚝 𝚌𝚘𝚞𝚕𝚍 𝚋𝚎 𝚞𝚗𝚝𝚒𝚕 𝚢𝚘𝚞 𝚜𝚑𝚊𝚛𝚎𝚍 𝚢𝚘𝚞𝚛 𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚛𝚎𝚝 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚖𝚎. 𝚂𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚐'𝚜 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚒𝚗' 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛, 𝚖𝚖𝚖 𝚖𝚖𝚖... 𝚜𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚐'𝚜 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚒𝚗' 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛, 𝚖𝚖𝚖 𝚖𝚖𝚖... 𝚜𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚐'𝚜 𝚌𝚘𝚖𝚒𝚗' 𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚛 𝚖𝚎. 𝙼𝚢 𝚋𝚊𝚋𝚢'𝚜 𝚐𝚘𝚝 𝚊 𝚜𝚎𝚌𝚛𝚎𝚝."

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Let's go...

Last night I was working on the upcoming zine "Dead in Hollywood: The Crucifixion of George Michael (Issue #11) when I spilled a glass of water on my laptop, frying it. I lost everything! Or so I thought. Spending three dollars a month on iCloud storage space turned out to be quite the bargain. The laptop was not so lucky. I'm still hoping to finish the issue before the L.A. Zine Fest on May 26th. I pray to George Michael that I will. "The Crucifixion of George Michael" will focus on Michael's arrest on April 8, 1998, for a "lewd act" in a public restroom in a Beverly Hills park, forcing the pop icon out of the closet. Michael's helped me come to terms with my own sexuality. At 13, my conservative, Trump-loving uncle bought me Michael's "Faith" album for Christmas. He's never really spoken to me after I came out years later in 1998. It's not just pop icons and mythical religious figures who are shunned and crucified. BTW, that uncle also introduced me to En Vogue's "Funky Divas" album on a road trip to Mexico when I was 14. Maybe I'll send him a copy of the zine when I'm finished. Maybe it'll free his mind and help heal the pain. DEAD IN HOLLYWOOD: THE CRUCIFIXION OF GEORGE MICHAEL (ISSUE #11) COMING SOON TO THE WILL ROGERS MEMORIAL PARK IN BEVERLY HILLS.

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Accepting Submissions!!!

Calling all Sal Mineo fans! What does Sal mean to you? Dead in Hollywood will be accepting submissions for the upcoming zine "Sal Mineo: The First Gay Teenager." The issue will focus on Sal's performance as one of the first gay teenagers in a major motion picture (Rebel Without a Cause) as well as Sal's groundbreaking 1972 interview where he comes out as bisexual. DM me for more details and feel free to forward this to any fellow Sal fans. Feel free to e-mail Dead in Hollywood at thehellfirepress@gmail.com for more info!

The Day I Met Carrie Fisher

𝙾𝚗 𝙳𝚎𝚌𝚎𝚖𝚋𝚎𝚛 𝟻, 𝟸𝟶𝟷𝟻, 𝙸 𝚖𝚎𝚝 𝚖𝚢 𝚏𝚒𝚛𝚜𝚝 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎, 𝙲𝚊𝚛𝚛𝚒𝚎 𝙵𝚒𝚜𝚑𝚎𝚛.

𝚆𝚑𝚎𝚗 𝙸 𝚠𝚊𝚜 𝚏𝚒𝚟𝚎-𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛𝚜-𝚘𝚕𝚍, 𝙸 𝚜𝚊𝚠 "𝚁𝚎𝚝𝚞𝚛𝚗 𝚘𝚏 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝙹𝚎𝚍𝚒" 𝚒𝚗 𝚊 𝚜𝚖𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚊𝚝𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚗 𝚊𝚗 𝚎𝚟𝚎𝚗 𝚜𝚖𝚊𝚕𝚕𝚎𝚛 𝚝𝚘𝚠𝚗 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚖𝚒𝚍𝚍𝚕𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚃𝚎𝚡𝚊𝚜. 𝙰𝚜 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚌𝚛𝚎𝚍𝚒𝚝𝚜 𝚛𝚘𝚕𝚕𝚎𝚍, 𝚖𝚢 𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚕𝚍 𝚘𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚎𝚍 𝚞𝚙. 𝙸 𝚍𝚎𝚌𝚒𝚍𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚗 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚛𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸 𝚠𝚊𝚜 𝚐𝚘𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚝𝚘 𝚛𝚞𝚗 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚢 𝚝𝚘 𝚊 𝚐𝚊𝚕𝚊𝚡𝚢 𝚏𝚊𝚛, 𝚏𝚊𝚛 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚢 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚓𝚘𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚋𝚎𝚕𝚜 𝚒𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚒𝚛 𝚏𝚒𝚐𝚑𝚝 𝚊𝚐𝚊𝚒𝚗𝚜𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚎𝚟𝚒𝚕 𝚎𝚖𝚙𝚒𝚛𝚎. 𝚃𝚑𝚎𝚜𝚎 𝚏𝚊𝚗𝚝𝚊𝚜𝚒𝚎𝚜 𝚞𝚜𝚞𝚊𝚕𝚕𝚢 𝚎𝚗𝚍𝚎𝚍 𝚒𝚗 𝚊𝚗 𝚊𝚠𝚊𝚛𝚍𝚜 𝚌𝚎𝚛𝚎𝚖𝚘𝚗𝚢 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝙿𝚛𝚒𝚗𝚌𝚎𝚜𝚜 𝙻𝚎𝚒𝚊 𝚋𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚘𝚠𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚞𝚙𝚘𝚗 𝚖𝚎 𝚊 𝚖𝚎𝚍𝚊𝚕 𝚘𝚏 𝚑𝚘𝚗𝚘𝚛 𝚏𝚘𝚛 𝚖𝚢 𝚋𝚛𝚊𝚟𝚎𝚛𝚢 𝚊𝚐𝚊𝚒𝚗𝚜𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚏𝚘𝚛𝚌𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚏 𝚎𝚟𝚒𝚕. 𝙸 𝚍𝚒𝚍𝚗'𝚝 𝚔𝚗𝚘𝚠 𝚒𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎𝚗, 𝚋𝚞𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚊𝚕 𝙿𝚛𝚒𝚗𝚌𝚎𝚜𝚜 𝙻𝚎𝚒𝚊 𝚠𝚘𝚞𝚕𝚍 𝚋𝚎𝚜𝚝𝚘𝚠 𝚞𝚙𝚘𝚗 𝚖𝚎 𝚊 𝚋𝚊𝚍𝚐𝚎 𝚘𝚏 𝚑𝚘𝚗𝚘𝚛 𝚘𝚏 𝚖𝚢 𝚘𝚠𝚗 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚛𝚝𝚢 𝚢𝚎𝚊𝚛𝚜 𝚕𝚊𝚝𝚎𝚛. 𝙸 𝚝𝚘𝚕𝚍 𝙲𝚊𝚛𝚛𝚒𝚎 𝙵𝚒𝚜𝚑𝚎𝚛 𝚒𝚗 𝟸𝟶𝟷𝟻 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎𝚍 𝚑𝚎𝚛 𝚋𝚎𝚏𝚘𝚛𝚎 𝙸 𝚛𝚎𝚊𝚕𝚒𝚣𝚎𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸 𝚠𝚊𝚜 𝚐𝚊𝚢. 𝚂𝚑𝚎 𝚑𝚘𝚠𝚕𝚎𝚍, 𝚝𝚎𝚕𝚕𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚖𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙸 𝚠𝚊𝚜𝚗'𝚝 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚏𝚒𝚛𝚜𝚝 𝚐𝚊𝚢 𝚖𝚊𝚗 𝚝𝚘 𝚏𝚊𝚕𝚕 𝚒𝚗 𝚕𝚘𝚟𝚎 𝚠𝚒𝚝𝚑 𝚑𝚎𝚛. 𝚂𝚑𝚎 𝚙𝚞𝚕𝚕𝚎𝚍 𝚖𝚎 𝚒𝚗 𝚌𝚕𝚘𝚜𝚎, 𝚜𝚚𝚞𝚎𝚎𝚣𝚎𝚍 𝚖𝚎, 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚜𝚝𝚊𝚛𝚝𝚎𝚍 𝚔𝚒𝚜𝚜𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚖𝚢 𝚏𝚊𝚌𝚎.

𝙾𝚗 𝙳𝚎𝚌𝚎𝚖𝚋𝚎𝚛 𝟸𝟽, 𝟸𝟶𝟷𝟼, 𝙲𝚊𝚛𝚛𝚒𝚎 𝙵𝚒𝚜𝚑𝚎𝚛 𝚍𝚒𝚎𝚍. 𝚃𝚑𝚎 𝚛𝚎𝚋𝚎𝚕𝚕𝚒𝚘𝚗 𝚕𝚒𝚟𝚎𝚜 𝚘𝚗.

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Geneva Williams: A Footnote in a Footnote's Footnotes

Hard at work on Dead in Hollywood: Dorothy Dandridge (Issue #9) and I’m finding it difficult to pull myself away from her mother, Ruby’s, story. Ruby was a successful radio and television actress in her own right who left her husband to live with her “companion” in 1922 America. Can you imagine? Sadly, her companion, Geneva Williams, was not a good woman. She overworks Dorothy and her sister, Vivian, and sexually assaults Dorothy one night after Dorothy returns home from her first date with a boy. I’d love to learn more about Geneva, but she’s become a footnote in another footnote’s footnotes.

Ruby Dandridge

Reading up on Dorothy Dandridge's life, I find myself drawn to her mother, Ruby Dandridge. Five months before Dorothy is born, Ruby leaves her husband, Cyril Dandridge, and moves in with her "companion," Geneva Williams. This was 1922! A black woman divorcing her husband was almost unheard of at the time and not to mention the fact that Ruby was also pregnant with Dorothy. But that's exactly what she does. She chooses not only to survive but to thrive in the repressed society of the 1920’s. I can’t even imagine what that must have been like for Ruby.